Autonomous Industrial Vehicle Technology Symposium
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2017 Conference Programme

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Day 1

Tuesday 14 November

Networking Breakfast

Join us on the opening morning for our complimentary networking breakfast. All speakers, delegates, and sponsors are invited to attend.

Keynote Presentations

Moderator
Steven Sokolsky, program manager, CALSTART, USA

09:00 - ASI's state-of-the-art technology for driverless industrial vehicles
Mel Torrie, CEO/founder, Autonomous Solutions Inc., USA
Autonomous Solutions Inc (ASI) has robotic vehicles operating around the world in markets like mining, agriculture, automotive and security. Technology developments like ASI’s multi-vehicle command and control software give a single operator control over a fleet of vehicles. However, ASI’s driverless technology wouldn’t be possible without continued work in localisation for increased accuracy indoors/outdoors and environmental awareness for obstacle detection/avoidance. ASI engineers have succeeded along the way to make the technology smarter and more aware of surroundings.

09:30 - Challenges and benefits to autonomous vehicles in agriculture
Brad Lukac, autonomous vehicles program director, CNH Industrial, USA
The presentation will focus on the CNH interpretation of the five levels of autonomous and how CNH interprets an automotive standard and applies it to agriculture. Autonomous agricultural equipment can evolve on today's vehicles and once the technology becomes mainstream, it can change the way that the vehicles themselves will be designed. Autonomous technology becomes the enabling technology for a variety of sustainability needs.

10:00 - Modular and flexible approaches to autonomous haulage for surface mines
James Whitfield, PE, GM R&D, Liebherr Mining Equipment, USA
The mining industry is transitioning into autonomous haulage, where early adopters are using unmanned haul trucks for autonomous operation in surface mines. In some cases, operators of autonomous haulage systems require flexibility with respect to equipment and suppliers. This presentation will discuss the possibilities to decompose autonomous haulage into modular elements with interfaces. Potential interface points will be discussed. Concepts of open protocols that can support autonomy will also be discussed. These concepts are to address the growing need for a modular and flexible supply scope to support the future needs of autonomous haulage.

10:30 - 11:00 - Break

11:00 - Caterpillar - construction automation
Joe Forcash, robotics automation supervisor, Caterpillar, USA
Caterpillar has been automating and digitizing the mining Industry for years. Its successful history will allow Caterpillar to transform the construction industry in terms of autonomy.

11:30 - Hitachi's approach for enabling mining solutions
Dr Toshimichi Minowa, general manager, corporate strategy division, Hitachi Construction Machinery, JAPAN
Burkhard Janssen, general manager product management and engineering, Hitachi Construction Machinery (Europe) NV, NETHERLANDS
Hitachi Construction Machinery (HCM) has been developing mining solutions that will reduce lifecycle cost and improve productivity and safety by using Hitachi group’s technologies. These innovative technologies focus on automotive control, railway signal controls, robotics and model-based designs. Based on this, Hitachi has developed new solutions for mining machines and systems. This presentation will outline HCM’s smart machine and AHS (Autonomous Haulage System), and future innovations.

12:00 - 13:00 - Keynote Panel Discussion – The Future of Autonomous Industrial and Off-Highway Vehicles

Mel Torrie, CEO/founder, Autonomous Solutions Inc., USA
Brad Lukac, autonomous vehicles program director, CNH Industrial, USA
James Whitfield, PE, GM R&D, Liebherr Mining Equipment, USA
Joe Forcash, robotics automation supervisor, Caterpillar, USA
Jeroen Snoeck, director connected site and machine services, Volvo Construction Equipment, BELGIUM
Burkhard Janssen, general manager product management and engineering, Hitachi Construction Machinery (Europe) NV, NETHERLANDS


Moderator:
Steven Sokolsky, program manager, CALSTART

13:00 - 14:00 - Lunch

Day 1 (Afternoon)

Moderator
Gunwant Dhadyalla, principal engineer, WMG - University of Warwick, UK

14:00 - Connected/automated vehicle technology demonstration-validation activities by the US Army
Steven Sokolsky, program manager, CALSTART, USA
This presentation will preview demonstrations that are underway and directed by the US Army. These involve vehicle-to-vehicle communications and mixed convoys (military and commercial) that will communicate primarily through radios, along with Cooperative adaptive cruise control (CACC) integrated with braking. Tests will include the study of the effects of bridges and tunnels on radar, sensors and communications equipment. Other tests involve over-the-road convoys and investigating the integration of the Army’s AMAS/AGR systems and equipment with commercially-available DSRC radios, along with the validation of vehicle-to-vehicle and vehicle-to-infrastructure technologies.

14:30 - GPS Denied Localisation: A Vision Based Approach
Prof Nabil Aouf, professor of autonomous systems, Cranfield University, UK
In recent years there has been great interest in using autonomous vehicles in the civilian and defense sectors. The applications these platforms are used for range from improving situational awareness to providing new mode of transportation. Operations are usually run in hostile and/or urban environments where GPS signals are often jammed or simply not available. To improve the level of autonomy of these machines, it is essential to have intelligence in terms of efficient algorithms providing GPS denied localization. This presentation will focus on such algorithms, which are based on multi-modality exteroceptive imaging sensors.

15:00 - 15:30 - Break

15:30 - New methodologies for the development and validation of automated systems
Eric Chan, global technical expert - connected and automated vehicles, Ricardo, UK
Connected and automated industrial vehicle systems have the potential to bring considerable efficiency savings, but they will also need to be designed to meet demanding safety, security and cybersecurity requirements. Today’s cybercriminals are increasingly deliberately targeting businesses with ransomware, as they know that the companies' IT systems are essential to their survival. Connected automated industrial systems combining vehicles, control centres and IoT devices will become potential targets of cybercriminals in the future. New processes and methodologies for the development, testing and validation of such software-intensive industrial vehicle systems will have to be created, drawing on expertise from parallel industries.

16:00 - Industrial vehicle mobile data acquisition in harsh environments with smart technologies
Finn Lange, product manager, HBM GmbH, GERMANY
During the development phase of industrial vehicles it is essential to acquire lots of measurement data to optimise the functionality and robustness of construction and agricultural vehicles. A measurement system for mobile data acquisition in harsh environments requires high flexibility and functionality for hardware and software. Besides the pure measuring of analogue sensor data, digital signals like field buses, GPS signals and video data also need to be integrated and visualised. New technologies allow a convenient workflow and remote control of the DAQ system so that the test engineer can trace the tests from the office.

16:30 - Industrial vehicle functional safety standard for autonomous vehicles
Amin Amini, functional safety manager, ROSAS Center, SWITZERLAND
Autonomous vehicles are associated with new hazards compared with conventional vehicles. The risks are due to the fact that the system must replace the driver's decision making. This approach is very effective so long as the functionality of the system is ensured in a secure and safe manner. To solve this challenge, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) proposed ISO 26262 'Road vehicles – functional safety'. The presentation aims to describe how to apply ISO 26262 to autonomous industrial vehicle development and how to couple functional safety with cybersecurity issues.

Day 2

Wednesday 15 November

Day 2 (Morning)

Moderator - to be confirmed

09:00 - Software for autonomy – where, what and how?
Prof Paul Newman, founder, Oxbotica, UK
Where am I? What is around me? What should I do? What should I share? All good questions and all foundational to mobile autonomy. In this talk I’ll walk through the core competencies and modular nature of Selenium – Oxbotica’s autonomy stack, which has been specifically designed from its governing principles to its implementation detail to not only drive driverless cars, but also bring that energy and opportunity to non-road and industrial vehicles. There will be plenty of eye-candy.

09:30 - Covering test scenarios for connected and autonomous vehicles using constrained randomised testing
Gunwant Dhadyalla, principal engineer, WMG - University of Warwick, UK
The challenge of test scenario coverage for connected and autonomous vehicles is well discussed and documented. New approaches are needed using existing knowledge and experience. We present a novel application of automated constrained randomisation techniques in the WMG 3xD driving simulator for intelligent vehicles using Vertizan Limited’s Vitaq test suite, taken from successful application in the semiconductor industry. The technique is deployed statically to automatically create test scenarios for testing of ADAS and automated systems, and we will present our experiences and plans for use on current UK collaborative R&D ADAS and autonomy projects including INTACT and SAVVY.

10:00 - Evolving autonomous vehicle systems
Calum Cawley, connected and autonomous vehicle technologist, HORIBA MIRA Ltd, UK
With over a decade of experience developing unmanned and autonomous vehicles for both on- and off-road applications, this review will look at work based around the Modular Autonomous Control Equipment (MACE) architecture, exploring the architecture and how it is deployed across a range of vehicles with minimal per-platform changes needed. It will also describe how the MACE framework is evolving to include new tools such as deep learning.

10:30 - 11:00 - Break

11:00 - Using sensor fusion to verify system functionality for autonomous driving industrial vehicles
Benjamin Michel, RF and communications, National Instruments, GERMANY
As ADAS systems continue to evolve and gain greater significance as enabling technologies for autonomous driving vehicles, the related test requirements and test methodologies for such systems increase in complexity. This presentation will showcase the NI platform and how a modular and scalable instrumentation platform can directly address this growing complexity and empower researchers and engineers needing to integrate sensor fusion through radar, lidar, vision and wireless communication (V2X) technologies for the next-generation ADAS capabilities. This presentation will focus on demos, videos and discussions on V2X communication test and ADAS HIL test methodologies.

11:30 - Machine learning empowers excavator productivity – technical approach and benefits
Tim Wunderlich, robotics and machine learning, Vemcon GmbH, GERMANY
Marc Riebl, business development, Vemcon GmbH, GERMANY
Excavators of the future will be smart and self-learning machines that will help contractors substantially increase productivity through automation. Based on the Vemcon CoPilot excavating solution (automatic grading) we achieve machine learning in excavators by recording the machine's state data, which is then used to train dynamic neural networks. The neural networks' inputs are the electric control signals, which the Vemcon CoPilot sends to the controllable hydraulic valves. The network's outputs are the excavator arm's motion. This makes it possible to run model-in-the-loop and hardware-in-the-loop tests of the entire system consisting of the Vemcon CoPilot and the excavator.

12:00 - Track and blade model for autonomous bulldozers
Dr Dror Rubinstein, senior researcher, Technion, ISRAEL
Track and blade models are necessary to develop controllers for bulldozer operation using high-fidelity simulations. These models can also be used for real-time simulations. The present track model is suitable for any kind of tracked vehicle. It was built for multi-link and rubber tracks, taking into account all necessary details of the contact between any single-track link and soil. The blade model is used to calculate the interaction force between the blade and the soil. The accumulated pile of soil is also considered in the model. Good correlations between simulations and experimental results were obtained.

12:30 - The merging of precision agriculture and autonomous vehicle technologies
Darcy Cook, director of engineering, JCA Electronics, CANADA
Precision agriculture built on GNSS and automation technologies has developed over the last 20 years, resulting in common industry functions such as auto-steer, prescription application, swath coverage and section control. Autonomous vehicle technology, largely driven by the automotive market, has also developed rapidly over recent years. These technologies are now being merged in the development of a branch of autonomous vehicles unique to the agriculture industry, which has very different needs than machines in other industries. The merging and evolution of these technologies is discussed, supported by examples of real-world autonomous agriculture applications developed by JCA Electronics.

13:00 - 14:00 - Lunch

Day 2 (Afternoon)

Moderator
Dr Niall Caldwell, managing director, Artemis Intelligent Power Ltd, UK

14:00 - Virtual test and validation using real-time-capable physical sensor models
Josef Henning, product management lead, IPG Automotive GmbH, GERMANY
Virtual test driving is the key for efficient and reproducible test and validation of autonomous driving functions both on and off road. New physical sensor models have been added to IPG Automotive’s CarMaker product family, enabling testing of components and functions in realistic and reproducible virtual scenarios. Camera and radar models are discussed in depth, and use cases are presented as examples. The proposed sensor models are real-time capable and thus can be used throughout the whole development process – from model- and software-in-the-loop to hardware- and vehicle-in-the-loop – ensuring a holistic and efficient approach to virtual test and validation.

14:30 - Timing synchronisation analysis of gPTP emulated devices using hybrid topology
Jeff Warra, head of automotive technology, Spirent Communications, USA
This paper will discuss system timing analysis techniques using a hybrid ECU topology approach. By creating a multi-ECU domain of real/emulated devices and streams, architects can understand and test the timing impact and overhead of an overall system function related to signal flow from sensors to endpoints or processing units. Architects can analyse cross-domain timing to understand switch software stack impacts on signal flow and data reconstruction as a function of network load. Examples will show how to use high-resolution stream block sampling to understand operating system cadence to better understand context switching time.

15:00 - 15:30 - Break

15:30 - Commercialisation of inductive charging for autonomous vehicles
Andrew Daga, CEO, Momentum Dynamics Corporation, USA
Synopsis to be confirmed

16:00 - Truck-trailer communication requirements for automated driving
Holger Zeltwanger, managing director, CAN in Automation, GERMANY
Trucks can already perform autonomously some tasks of the driver. This includes emergency braking, lane departure, etc. However, if a trailer is connected, these functions can't be used. In the past, just the two CAN-based ISO 11992 networks have been standardised. The above-mentioned automated driving functions require additional sensors – not the trailer, but some pre-processing of them in the trailer ECU, and an appropriate communication link to the truck. The paper introduces the currently discussed lane departure function of trucks/trailers. It also provides an outlook on the future including the requirements on safety and security.

16:30 - Potentials of omnidirectional track drive system for off-road vehicles
Rafael Mortensen Ernits, research scientist, BIBA - Bremer Institut für Produktion und Logistik GmbH, GERMANY
Omnidirectional drives are very common in robotics. They enable a robot to move completely freely on a plane and thus deliver excellent manoeuvrability. Nevertheless, they also impose high demands on the evenness and cleanliness of the floor. The construction machinery market constantly calls for improvements in manoeuvrability of vehicles. Omnidirectional drive technology can meet such requirements. However, a direct transfer from the omnidirectional technology commonly used for robots is not possible due to the rough work environment found at construction sites. This presentation will discuss the opportunities of omnidirectional technology for construction machines.

*This Programme may be subject to change.

Day 1

Tuesday 14 November

Networking Breakfast

Join us on the opening morning for our complimentary networking breakfast. All speakers, delegates, and sponsors are invited to attend.

Keynote Presentations

Moderator
Steven Sokolsky, program manager, CALSTART, USA

09:00 - ASI's state-of-the-art technology for driverless industrial vehicles
Mel Torrie, CEO/founder, Autonomous Solutions Inc., USA
Autonomous Solutions Inc (ASI) has robotic vehicles operating around the world in markets like mining, agriculture, automotive and security. Technology developments like ASI’s multi-vehicle command and control software give a single operator control over a fleet of vehicles. However, ASI’s driverless technology wouldn’t be possible without continued work in localisation for increased accuracy indoors/outdoors and environmental awareness for obstacle detection/avoidance. ASI engineers have succeeded along the way to make the technology smarter and more aware of surroundings.

09:30 - Challenges and benefits to autonomous vehicles in agriculture
Brad Lukac, autonomous vehicles program director, CNH Industrial, USA
The presentation will focus on the CNH interpretation of the five levels of autonomous and how CNH interprets an automotive standard and applies it to agriculture. Autonomous agricultural equipment can evolve on today's vehicles and once the technology becomes mainstream, it can change the way that the vehicles themselves will be designed. Autonomous technology becomes the enabling technology for a variety of sustainability needs.

10:00 - Modular and flexible approaches to autonomous haulage for surface mines
James Whitfield, PE, GM R&D, Liebherr Mining Equipment, USA
The mining industry is transitioning into autonomous haulage, where early adopters are using unmanned haul trucks for autonomous operation in surface mines. In some cases, operators of autonomous haulage systems require flexibility with respect to equipment and suppliers. This presentation will discuss the possibilities to decompose autonomous haulage into modular elements with interfaces. Potential interface points will be discussed. Concepts of open protocols that can support autonomy will also be discussed. These concepts are to address the growing need for a modular and flexible supply scope to support the future needs of autonomous haulage.

10:30 - 11:00 - Break

11:00 - Caterpillar - construction automation
Joe Forcash, robotics automation supervisor, Caterpillar, USA
Caterpillar has been automating and digitizing the mining Industry for years. Its successful history will allow Caterpillar to transform the construction industry in terms of autonomy.

11:30 - Hitachi's approach for enabling mining solutions
Dr Toshimichi Minowa, general manager, corporate strategy division, Hitachi Construction Machinery, JAPAN
Burkhard Janssen, general manager product management and engineering, Hitachi Construction Machinery (Europe) NV, NETHERLANDS
Hitachi Construction Machinery (HCM) has been developing mining solutions that will reduce lifecycle cost and improve productivity and safety by using Hitachi group’s technologies. These innovative technologies focus on automotive control, railway signal controls, robotics and model-based designs. Based on this, Hitachi has developed new solutions for mining machines and systems. This presentation will outline HCM’s smart machine and AHS (Autonomous Haulage System), and future innovations.

12:00 - 13:00 - Keynote Panel Discussion – The Future of Autonomous Industrial and Off-Highway Vehicles

Mel Torrie, CEO/founder, Autonomous Solutions Inc., USA
Brad Lukac, autonomous vehicles program director, CNH Industrial, USA
James Whitfield, PE, GM R&D, Liebherr Mining Equipment, USA
Joe Forcash, robotics automation supervisor, Caterpillar, USA
Jeroen Snoeck, director connected site and machine services, Volvo Construction Equipment, BELGIUM
Burkhard Janssen, general manager product management and engineering, Hitachi Construction Machinery (Europe) NV, NETHERLANDS


Moderator:
Steven Sokolsky, program manager, CALSTART

13:00 - 14:00 - Lunch

Day 1 (Afternoon)

Moderator
Gunwant Dhadyalla, principal engineer, WMG - University of Warwick, UK

14:00 - Connected/automated vehicle technology demonstration-validation activities by the US Army
Steven Sokolsky, program manager, CALSTART, USA
This presentation will preview demonstrations that are underway and directed by the US Army. These involve vehicle-to-vehicle communications and mixed convoys (military and commercial) that will communicate primarily through radios, along with Cooperative adaptive cruise control (CACC) integrated with braking. Tests will include the study of the effects of bridges and tunnels on radar, sensors and communications equipment. Other tests involve over-the-road convoys and investigating the integration of the Army’s AMAS/AGR systems and equipment with commercially-available DSRC radios, along with the validation of vehicle-to-vehicle and vehicle-to-infrastructure technologies.

14:30 - GPS Denied Localisation: A Vision Based Approach
Prof Nabil Aouf, professor of autonomous systems, Cranfield University, UK
In recent years there has been great interest in using autonomous vehicles in the civilian and defense sectors. The applications these platforms are used for range from improving situational awareness to providing new mode of transportation. Operations are usually run in hostile and/or urban environments where GPS signals are often jammed or simply not available. To improve the level of autonomy of these machines, it is essential to have intelligence in terms of efficient algorithms providing GPS denied localization. This presentation will focus on such algorithms, which are based on multi-modality exteroceptive imaging sensors.

15:00 - 15:30 - Break

15:30 - New methodologies for the development and validation of automated systems
Eric Chan, global technical expert - connected and automated vehicles, Ricardo, UK
Connected and automated industrial vehicle systems have the potential to bring considerable efficiency savings, but they will also need to be designed to meet demanding safety, security and cybersecurity requirements. Today’s cybercriminals are increasingly deliberately targeting businesses with ransomware, as they know that the companies' IT systems are essential to their survival. Connected automated industrial systems combining vehicles, control centres and IoT devices will become potential targets of cybercriminals in the future. New processes and methodologies for the development, testing and validation of such software-intensive industrial vehicle systems will have to be created, drawing on expertise from parallel industries.

16:00 - Industrial vehicle mobile data acquisition in harsh environments with smart technologies
Finn Lange, product manager, HBM GmbH, GERMANY
During the development phase of industrial vehicles it is essential to acquire lots of measurement data to optimise the functionality and robustness of construction and agricultural vehicles. A measurement system for mobile data acquisition in harsh environments requires high flexibility and functionality for hardware and software. Besides the pure measuring of analogue sensor data, digital signals like field buses, GPS signals and video data also need to be integrated and visualised. New technologies allow a convenient workflow and remote control of the DAQ system so that the test engineer can trace the tests from the office.

16:30 - Industrial vehicle functional safety standard for autonomous vehicles
Amin Amini, functional safety manager, ROSAS Center, SWITZERLAND
Autonomous vehicles are associated with new hazards compared with conventional vehicles. The risks are due to the fact that the system must replace the driver's decision making. This approach is very effective so long as the functionality of the system is ensured in a secure and safe manner. To solve this challenge, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) proposed ISO 26262 'Road vehicles – functional safety'. The presentation aims to describe how to apply ISO 26262 to autonomous industrial vehicle development and how to couple functional safety with cybersecurity issues.

*This Programme may be subject to change.

Day 2

Wednesday 15 November

Day 2 (Morning)

Moderator - to be confirmed

09:00 - Software for autonomy – where, what and how?
Prof Paul Newman, founder, Oxbotica, UK
Where am I? What is around me? What should I do? What should I share? All good questions and all foundational to mobile autonomy. In this talk I’ll walk through the core competencies and modular nature of Selenium – Oxbotica’s autonomy stack, which has been specifically designed from its governing principles to its implementation detail to not only drive driverless cars, but also bring that energy and opportunity to non-road and industrial vehicles. There will be plenty of eye-candy.

09:30 - Covering test scenarios for connected and autonomous vehicles using constrained randomised testing
Gunwant Dhadyalla, principal engineer, WMG - University of Warwick, UK
The challenge of test scenario coverage for connected and autonomous vehicles is well discussed and documented. New approaches are needed using existing knowledge and experience. We present a novel application of automated constrained randomisation techniques in the WMG 3xD driving simulator for intelligent vehicles using Vertizan Limited’s Vitaq test suite, taken from successful application in the semiconductor industry. The technique is deployed statically to automatically create test scenarios for testing of ADAS and automated systems, and we will present our experiences and plans for use on current UK collaborative R&D ADAS and autonomy projects including INTACT and SAVVY.

10:00 - Evolving autonomous vehicle systems
Calum Cawley, connected and autonomous vehicle technologist, HORIBA MIRA Ltd, UK
With over a decade of experience developing unmanned and autonomous vehicles for both on- and off-road applications, this review will look at work based around the Modular Autonomous Control Equipment (MACE) architecture, exploring the architecture and how it is deployed across a range of vehicles with minimal per-platform changes needed. It will also describe how the MACE framework is evolving to include new tools such as deep learning.

10:30 - 11:00 - Break

11:00 - Using sensor fusion to verify system functionality for autonomous driving industrial vehicles
Benjamin Michel, RF and communications, National Instruments, GERMANY
As ADAS systems continue to evolve and gain greater significance as enabling technologies for autonomous driving vehicles, the related test requirements and test methodologies for such systems increase in complexity. This presentation will showcase the NI platform and how a modular and scalable instrumentation platform can directly address this growing complexity and empower researchers and engineers needing to integrate sensor fusion through radar, lidar, vision and wireless communication (V2X) technologies for the next-generation ADAS capabilities. This presentation will focus on demos, videos and discussions on V2X communication test and ADAS HIL test methodologies.

11:30 - Machine learning empowers excavator productivity – technical approach and benefits
Tim Wunderlich, robotics and machine learning, Vemcon GmbH, GERMANY
Marc Riebl, business development, Vemcon GmbH, GERMANY
Excavators of the future will be smart and self-learning machines that will help contractors substantially increase productivity through automation. Based on the Vemcon CoPilot excavating solution (automatic grading) we achieve machine learning in excavators by recording the machine's state data, which is then used to train dynamic neural networks. The neural networks' inputs are the electric control signals, which the Vemcon CoPilot sends to the controllable hydraulic valves. The network's outputs are the excavator arm's motion. This makes it possible to run model-in-the-loop and hardware-in-the-loop tests of the entire system consisting of the Vemcon CoPilot and the excavator.

12:00 - Track and blade model for autonomous bulldozers
Dr Dror Rubinstein, senior researcher, Technion, ISRAEL
Track and blade models are necessary to develop controllers for bulldozer operation using high-fidelity simulations. These models can also be used for real-time simulations. The present track model is suitable for any kind of tracked vehicle. It was built for multi-link and rubber tracks, taking into account all necessary details of the contact between any single-track link and soil. The blade model is used to calculate the interaction force between the blade and the soil. The accumulated pile of soil is also considered in the model. Good correlations between simulations and experimental results were obtained.

12:30 - The merging of precision agriculture and autonomous vehicle technologies
Darcy Cook, director of engineering, JCA Electronics, CANADA
Precision agriculture built on GNSS and automation technologies has developed over the last 20 years, resulting in common industry functions such as auto-steer, prescription application, swath coverage and section control. Autonomous vehicle technology, largely driven by the automotive market, has also developed rapidly over recent years. These technologies are now being merged in the development of a branch of autonomous vehicles unique to the agriculture industry, which has very different needs than machines in other industries. The merging and evolution of these technologies is discussed, supported by examples of real-world autonomous agriculture applications developed by JCA Electronics.

13:00 - 14:00 - Lunch

Day 2 (Afternoon)

Moderator
Dr Niall Caldwell, managing director, Artemis Intelligent Power Ltd, UK

14:00 - Virtual test and validation using real-time-capable physical sensor models
Josef Henning, product management lead, IPG Automotive GmbH, GERMANY
Virtual test driving is the key for efficient and reproducible test and validation of autonomous driving functions both on and off road. New physical sensor models have been added to IPG Automotive’s CarMaker product family, enabling testing of components and functions in realistic and reproducible virtual scenarios. Camera and radar models are discussed in depth, and use cases are presented as examples. The proposed sensor models are real-time capable and thus can be used throughout the whole development process – from model- and software-in-the-loop to hardware- and vehicle-in-the-loop – ensuring a holistic and efficient approach to virtual test and validation.

14:30 - Timing synchronisation analysis of gPTP emulated devices using hybrid topology
Jeff Warra, head of automotive technology, Spirent Communications, USA
This paper will discuss system timing analysis techniques using a hybrid ECU topology approach. By creating a multi-ECU domain of real/emulated devices and streams, architects can understand and test the timing impact and overhead of an overall system function related to signal flow from sensors to endpoints or processing units. Architects can analyse cross-domain timing to understand switch software stack impacts on signal flow and data reconstruction as a function of network load. Examples will show how to use high-resolution stream block sampling to understand operating system cadence to better understand context switching time.

15:00 - 15:30 - Break

15:30 - Commercialisation of inductive charging for autonomous vehicles
Andrew Daga, CEO, Momentum Dynamics Corporation, USA
Synopsis to be confirmed

16:00 - Truck-trailer communication requirements for automated driving
Holger Zeltwanger, managing director, CAN in Automation, GERMANY
Trucks can already perform autonomously some tasks of the driver. This includes emergency braking, lane departure, etc. However, if a trailer is connected, these functions can't be used. In the past, just the two CAN-based ISO 11992 networks have been standardised. The above-mentioned automated driving functions require additional sensors – not the trailer, but some pre-processing of them in the trailer ECU, and an appropriate communication link to the truck. The paper introduces the currently discussed lane departure function of trucks/trailers. It also provides an outlook on the future including the requirements on safety and security.

16:30 - Potentials of omnidirectional track drive system for off-road vehicles
Rafael Mortensen Ernits, research scientist, BIBA - Bremer Institut für Produktion und Logistik GmbH, GERMANY
Omnidirectional drives are very common in robotics. They enable a robot to move completely freely on a plane and thus deliver excellent manoeuvrability. Nevertheless, they also impose high demands on the evenness and cleanliness of the floor. The construction machinery market constantly calls for improvements in manoeuvrability of vehicles. Omnidirectional drive technology can meet such requirements. However, a direct transfer from the omnidirectional technology commonly used for robots is not possible due to the rough work environment found at construction sites. This presentation will discuss the opportunities of omnidirectional technology for construction machines.

*This Programme may be subject to change.

 
 

 
 

Held alongside:

Electric & Hybrid Industrial Vehicle Technology Symposium

 
Topics under discussion:
    • Autonomous vehicle hardware
    • Lidar systems
    • Sensors
    • Autonomous loading systems
    • Robotics and AI technology
    • Guidance and mapping systems
    • Remote monitoring
    • Testing and validation
    • Autonomous software
    • Obstacle detection and collision avoidance
    • Connected vehicle technology and IoT
    • Vision guidance systems
 
Vehicle Applications:
  • Excavators
  • Construction
  • Open mining and quarrying
  • Forestry
  • Agricultural
  • Crane and heavy lift
  • Road building
  • Lawn and garden
  • Forklift trucks
  • Airport ground support
  • Container handling
  • Municipal and cleaning
  • AGV/SGVs